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Work-in-Progress Talks give Tanner Humanities Center fellows and University of Utah faculty an opportunity
to present the latest work on their current research and receive feedback in a casual setting from students, faculty, staff, and community.

SPRING 2017 | SCHEDULE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 24 | NOON
BEN COHEN | Department of History

The Shape of Water in the Deccan, c. 1083-2013 explores the role of water in south India. Cohen’s objective is to rewrite Deccan history from a long term, hydrosocial perspective. By charting the history over a long chronological period, Cohen hopes to show how water influenced human activity in a dialectical relationship over time.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 31 | NOON
JESSICA HOUF|
Department of Communication
Bacteria, Bodies, and Boundaries: A Genealogy of Bacteria and the Human Body explores bacteria, life processes, and particular orifices that open the human body to being more-than-human. This project seeks to understand how we arrived at the idea that the human microbiome is bringing forth a “new microbial age.”

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21 | NOON
ANNE PETERSON |
Department of Philosophy
Matter, Composition, and Biological Unity in Aristotle argues that Aristotle sees the matter composing a biological organism as neither more fundamental than the organism, nor lacking any casual role in the organism’s life.  Instead, the casual and explanatory relationship between organisms and their matter is bidirectional and complex.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28 | NOON
MATT BASSO |
Department of History
Reworking Settler Societies: Labor and the Evolution of Settler Colonialism in New Zealand and the United States, 1890-1950 places industrial labor, laborers, and their organizations at the center of the history of the U.S. West and New Zealand. Basso’s project will explore what the grown of industrial economies, and the cultures they fostered, meant to the evolution of gender relations and politics in settler societies.

TUESDAY, MARCH 07 | NOON
COLLEEN O’NEILL 
| Department of History, Utah State University
Labor and Sovereignty: The Transformation of Work in Indian Country, 1890 to the Present, offers a new synthesis that moves beyond the individual tribe narrative, to offer a broader interpretive framework for understanding Native Americans, colonialism, and the history of US capitalism in the twentieth century. O’Neill’s project will explore how American Indians transformed the meaning of wage work from an assimilationist tool to a sovereignty right. 

TUESDAY, MARCH 21 | NOON

GAVIN FELLER | Department of Communication Studies, University of Iowa
Enamored but Ambivalent: Mormonism and 20th Century New Media is an interdisciplinary and interpretive analysis of Mormonism’s historical relationship with new media technology. Feller plans to explore the existing tensions by examining Mormonism’s approach to emerging radio, television, and Internet technologies across the 20th century

TUESDAY, MARCH 28 | NOON
PIERRE-JULIEN HARTER 
| Department of Philosophy, Saint Xavier University
An expansion upon his dissertation, Buddhas in the Making: Path, Perfectability, and Gnosis in the Abhisamayālaṃkāra Literaturefocuses on the idea of self-transformation in Indian and Tibetan Buddhist literature. Harter will investigate philosophically the concept of the process of betterment that leads an individual to a perfect or perfected state.

TUESDAY, APRIL 04 | NOON
JONAH KATZ |
Asian Studies Major, Honors College
Analysis of 'Dream of the Red Chamber' - Katz plans to use geospatial and character network analysis to study the interactions of social hierarchies and cliques within the 18th century Chinese classic, Dream of the Red Chamber, one of the most beloved books in Chinese literature. Katz will examine the relationship between gender and class by looking at patterns of character interactions and the spaces in which these characters socialize.

TUESDAY, APRIL 04 | NOON
ANNE ROYSTON|
Department of English
Reading Theory as Artist’s Book: Materiality, Writing, Technology considers the intersection of philosophy and materiality in literary texts.  Considering texts such as George Bataille’s Encyclopedia Da Costa, Mark C. Taylor’s Hiding, and Johanna Drucker’s theoretical artist’s book Stochastic Poetics, Royston will explore how these texts stage arguments through their material form.

Last Updated: 9/20/16