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Previous Gateway to Learning Workshops

Gateway to Learning Workshops 2016

June 13-17, 2016: Using Online Course Materials to Individualize Student Learning 
Teachers struggle with how to reach students who are either behind the rest of the class or very far ahead. Online teaching tools can help by providing a manageable way for you to create and administer individualized learning activities for your students. Bring one of your existing lessons to this workshop and let us help you build supplemental online resources. You will finish the week with one set of resources for students who are struggling and a second set of resources for students who want to work ahead. Dr. Linda Ralston has taught online for nearly twenty years, designed online courses for several subject areas, and teaches the University of Utah Cyber Pedagogy course. She specializes in universal course design principles, including optimizing learning for students of all abilities. Heather Stone is a doctoral candidate who works as an online specialist in the Center for Teaching & Learning Excellence.

June 20-24, 2016: Middle Ages and Renaissance History
This workshop will focus on methods of teaching medieval and Renaissance history and culture. It will focus on the institutions, ideas and events of the period from 1000 to approximately 1650 and examine major political, religious, and social/cultural aspects and structures. Specifically, the topics addressed will include the medieval and Renaissance systems of government, Feudalism and centralization, challenges to monarchial authority in the form of Magna Carta and emerging parliamentary rule, and the rise of the commune (city-state) in Italy as the commercial merchant class endeavored to assert individual political and economic rights. The role that the Black Death played in these political developments will also be addressed. Furthermore, the workshop will discuss methods of teaching religious belief, expression and relations in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance and their influence on things like familial structures, art and social constructs, government, and events like the Crusades and the Medieval Holocaust, especially as they relate to present day. Finally, we will address effectively teaching cultural and intellectual developments in late medieval and Renaissance humanism, the arts, and science and technology, including the invention of the printing press.

June 27-July 1, 2016: Literary Classics II: Seminar on English and American Classics
This class—like the first Literary Classics seminar offered last summer--will once again be team-taught by University of Utah English faculty, and is aimed at Utah high school English teachers. The seminar will focus on important literary texts frequently taught in high school English classes--to help educators become more knowledgeable about particular authors and texts they may be likely (or may wish) to teach, and to give them more knowledge and tools (and models) for teaching these topics in their own classes. Texts to be discussed this time around may include works by Chaucer, Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, Twain, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Frost, Wilde, Joyce, and others.

July 11-15, 2016: Place, Story, and History in Contemporary World Literature
This course will survey contemporary world literature, with particular emphasis on questions about the relationships between local place and global space. We will read recent fiction from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East, and ask about the various ways local traditions respond to the pressures of globalization. How have writers used fiction to examine social and historical conflicts, challenge official histories, and recover forgotten voices and neglected traditions? And how have writers used traditional narrative resources to stretch the possibilities of the novel and the short story? In many of these works, local answers to global historical pressures involve reviving traditional aesthetic practices, and we will approach our materials as both social documents and works of art. We will also explore ways of bringing formal and aesthetic questions to bear on discussions of social issues in the classroom.

July 18-22, 2016: Teaching the Holocaust
This workshop will focus on varied pedagogical methods of teaching the Holocaust, with the aim of empowering educators to develop new approaches to the subject. Participants will become acquainted with innovative curricular methodologies used to highlight the contemporary relevance of the Holocaust, including connections to other genocides and sites of global trauma. Drawing on rich resources available through the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, we will explore ways to effectively use a range of materials (including multimedia sources as well as classic theoretical, historical, and literary texts) in diverse classroom settings.

July 26-29, 2016: The Great Transition: America Becomes Modern, 1880-1930
This workshop will focus on the United States’ transition from a face-to-face agricultural and mercantile economy dominated by communal fears of scarcity to a corporate industrial economy dominated by bureaucratic processes and an ethic of individual and family consumerism. During this period the Populist and Progressive movements brought an end to the “weak state” era in national politics, in response to citizen demands for a regulatory federal government. The seminar’s enduring understanding is that developments during this period fundamentally transformed American public and private life.       

August 1-5, 2016: Critical Issues in Urban Education
This workshop will provide an introduction to some of the most important problems and debates within Latin American history, society and culture in order to understand the changing demographics of the K-12 Latina/o population in Utah. This multi-disciplinary approach engages an array of materials including films, fiction/non-fiction books, photographs and art to understand migration and immigration patterns. It will guide participants in understanding systems of conquest and colonization in Latin America including active forms of resistance, decolonization, and transformation and how they translate into school structures and education. Topics of investigation and discussion includes: foundation to Multicultural Education Studies, Latin American Studies, Chicana/o Studies in Education, Critical, feminist, and Indigenous studies in education, Family, School, and Community Connections, and Discipline, Policing, and Education.

 August 8-12, 2016: Nature and Environment in Chinese Culture
As China faces a dire environmental crisis as the result of its rapid economic growth, more and more people in the world begin to pay attention to the human habitat around us. This seminar introduces the Chinese concept, attitude and official policies about nature from the antiquity to the present time. It will address the topic from the perspectives of philosophy, literature, policy, art, and media. All presenters are faculty from the University of Utah.

 

Gateway to Learning Workshops 2015 

Contemporary Rewritings and Adaptations of Classic Literature  (July 6-10 )
This workshop offers participants the opportunity to explore the pedagogical advantages of teaching classic works of literature alongside contemporary rewritings and adaptations of those works. Participants will investigate the wide field of novels, films, plays, and graphic novels that engage with and rework canonical literary texts—from Homer and Shakespeare to Austen and Twain. The workshop will focus on ways teachers can use contemporary rewritings to excite students about the continued cultural relevance of the classics, and to provoke students to ask critical questions about them. We will ask why writers and readers continually return to these classics, how contemporary writers critique or pay homage to them from diverse perspectives, and we will develop a variety of classroom activities and assignments that mutually illuminate the classic and the contemporary response. The primary example for our discussion will be Homer's Odyssey, alongside Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad (1999), Zachary Mason's The Lost Books of the Odyssey (2007), and the Coen Brothers' O Brother Where Are Thou (2000).

Contemporary China  (July 27-31)
This workshop will be presented by faculty from the University of Utah and Brigham Young University. The five sessions will focus on Chinese literature, politics, geography, diplomacy and society. 

The Environment in Film  (June 15-19)
This workshop offers an introduction to foundational topics in environmental humanities through an examination of environmental films. The course will introduce theories and concepts from philosophy, literature, science, and rhetoric that examine the relationship between humans, more-than-humans, and the natural world. Topics of investigation for the 2015 class will include bee colony collapse, genetics and the environment, the nature/culture divide, environmental social movements, food production, and animals. These theories and concepts will be examined through analysis of a series of documentary and feature films such as Queen of the Sun: What are the Bees Trying to Tell Us, and Bidder 70. Participants will engage in critical discussion of a variety of questions such as: What is the relationship between nature and culture? Can humans and more-than-human animals engage in meaningful communication? What is the relationship between science and environmental issues? How does popular culture portray a variety of ways of thinking about the environment? What is the role of environmental social movements in creating change? The course will include guest lectures from professors affiliated with the Environmental Humanities MA Program at the University of Utah. The course is available for repeat credit. The course will feature new theories, films, and topics.  

Children's Literature  --  June 22-26  
As we immerse ourselves in the wonder of children's literature, we'll explore how it helps us reflect on our notions of children and childhood; how it enhances and strengthens learning and relationship in the classroom, and how it can help children connect their learning to meaningful parts of their lives. As our exploration opens new avenues for thought, we will grapple with intersecting questions of identity, culture, and history that arise in reading together. Bring your imagination and curiosity, critical eyes, and probing questions. We'll be looking for how this literature reaches us, and our opportunities and responsibilities to respond to it.

The Cold War, the Military-Industrial-University Complex, and the American Middle Class  (June 29-July 2)
This workshop will focus on the interaction between foreign policy and the domestic economy in the expansion and maintenance of the largest and most prosperous middle class in American history, or between the 1944 G.I. Bill and the first Oil Crisis of 1973-4. The seminar's enduring understanding is that bipolar global confrontation with the Soviet Union reinforced a range of largely bipartisan "Cold War Liberal" domestic policies that worked to maximize employment and reduce income inequality during the 1950s and 1960s, certain other aspects of U.S. foreign policy, combined with an unrealistic expectation of indefinitely inexpensive energy, created a "pivot point" in the mid-1970s towards today's era of fierce international economic competition, lower real wages for "average Americans" and, combined with the subsequent triumph of free market/anti-government ideologies, rapid accelerating income inequality.

Multicultural Education (July 6-10)
Utah is a "new immigrant gateway," meaning that it has one of the fastest growing immigrant populations in the country. The vast majority of these immigrants come from Latin America, particularly Mexico. One result of this wave of migration is that Utah's classrooms are more multicultural than ever, presenting both challenges and opportunities for educators. This workshop will provide an introduction to the changing demographic population of K-12 students and provide participants with models and strategies for effectively teaching minority students that create classroom and school atmospheres that are accepting of diversity. Topics of investigation and discussion will include: the causes of migration and of settlement patterns in the United States; schools as key locations for integration and/or marginalization; challenges and opportunities diverse classrooms pose for students and teachers; culturally appropriate curriculum; deficit vs. asset perspectives on students and communities. The University of Utah's Latin American Studies Program is a proud sponsor of this workshop.

Literary Texts: Seminar on English and American Classics  (July 13-17)
This class will be team-taught by University of Utah English faculty, and is aimed at Utah high school English teachers. The seminar will focus on important literary texts frequently taught in high school English classes--to help educators become more knowledgeable about particular authors and texts they may be likely (or may wish) to teach, and to give them more knowledge and tools (and models) for teaching these topics in their own classes. Texts to be discussed might include works by Chaucer, Shakespeare, Austen, Dickens, Dickinson, Twain, Conrad, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Joyce, and others.

 

Gateway to Learning Workshops 2014

 

Reconstructing Utah's History (June 16 – 20)

This workshop offers an introduction to key themes in Utah history centered on major events that brought new peoples to Utah. It will explore among other things, Native American migrations to the state, Spanish incursions, the arrival of Mormon refugees, the Utah War and the coming of the transcontinental railroad, Utah's "new immigrants," and the impact of WWII. It will offer pedagogical ideas as well as historical information and is designed to explore ways in which teachers can rethink and reconstruct Utah history to include an array of perspectives. In that regard, it will view Utah as a meeting and mixing ground of diverse peoples from a variety of religious, cultural ethnic, and racial backgrounds. We will seek to understand what brought these peoples together, what drove them apart, how they viewed each other, and what methods of accommodation compromise, and/or conquest animated their exchanges. What has living in Utah meant for each group and how has that meaning changed over time? The Utah State Office of Education is a proud sponsor of this workshop.

The Civil War and Reconstruction (June 23 – 27)

This course will focus on the Civil War and Reconstruction era of American history, beginning roughly with the Mexican War and concluding with the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Major themes will include the divergent paths of social, economic, and political development in the North and South prior to the War; slavery and abolitionism; the emerging sectional crisis; the emergence of the Republican Party and the rise of Lincoln; secession and the onset of war; Northern and Southern strategies for the conduct of the war; major campaigns and leaders; the experience of war; emancipation; Northern victory and the reconstruction of the South; and the long-term consequences and significance of the Civil War in American history and memory. The Utah State Office of Education is a proud sponsor of this workshop.

The Environment in Film (July 7 – 11)

This workshop offers an introduction to foundational topics in environmental humanities through an examination of environmental films. The course will introduce theories and concepts from philosophy, sociology, science, and rhetoric that examine the relationship between humans, more-than-humans, and the natural world. Topics of investigation for the 2014 class will include ocean pollution and marine species, genetics and the environment, environmental social movements, and food. These theories and concepts will be examined through analysis of a series of documentary and feature films such as The Cove, Rivers and Tides, Bidder 70, and Food, Inc. Participants will engage in critical discussion of a variety of questions such as: What is the relationship between nature and culture? Can humans and more-than-human animals engage in meaningful communication? What is the relationship between science and environmental issues? How does popular culture portray a variety of ways of thinking about the environment? The course will include guest lectures from professors affiliated with the Environmental Humanities MA Program at the University of Utah. This course is available for repeat credit and will feature theories, films, and topics not covered in previous years.

William Shakespeare (July 7 – 11)

This workshop will give participants an opportunity to examine three Shakespeare plays from multiple angles: The Merchant of Venice (comedy), Henry V (history), and King Lear (tragedy). In this course, we will pull these works apart to look at imagery, characterization, and structure, then put them together again to explore larger questions of interpretation. We will also consider various approaches to teaching these plays to students. Stage and film versions, and (to a lesser extent) scholarly responses, will be part of our purview.

The Rise of the Dictators and World War II, 1924-1945 (July 14 – 18)

This workshop will focus on the historical circumstances that made Russian, Italian, and German civil society vulnerable to totalitarianism in the aftermath of the First World War, the nature of the global military conflict that destroyed two of those three regimes between 1939 and 1945, and the war efforts mounted by the Western Democracies: France, the United Kingdom and the United States. An enduring understanding for the workshop is that while during the mid-twentieth century the totalitarian powers were capable of great military efforts in the factory and on the battlefield, the U.S. and the U.K. were better able to mobilize their economic, human, and cultural resources for total war. The Utah State Office of Education is a proud sponsor of this workshop.

Survey of Ancient Chinese Civilization (July 28 – August 1)

In partnership with the Confucius Institute at the University of Utah, this workshop will offer a broad survey of ancient Chinese civilization by examining texts from philosophy, history, literature, and art.

Immigration and Education (August 4 – 8)

Utah is a "new immigrant gateway," meaning that it has one of the fastest growing immigrant populations in the country. The vast majority of these immigrants come from Latin America, particularly Mexico. This workshop will provide an introduction to the immigrant population from Latin America and to related issues that affect local schools. Topics of investigation and discussion will include: the causes of migration and of settlement patterns in the United States; the diversity of Utah's immigrant population; the unintended consequences of immigration policies; schools as key locations for integration and/or marginalization; challenges and opportunities diverse classrooms pose for students and teachers; and integration as a two-way process. The University of Utah's Latin American Studies Program is a proud sponsor of this workshop.


Gateway to Learning Workshops 2013

Sponsored by

Tanner Humanities Center

The Utah State Office of Education

The University of Utah Confucius Center

The University of Utah Asia Center

The University of Utah Environmental Humanities Program 

Reconstructing Utah's History (June 10 – 14)

An introduction to key themes in Utah history, including Native American migrations to the state, Spanish incursions, the arrival of Mormon refugees, the Utah War, and the impact of World War II.

The Environment in Film (June 24 – 28)

This workshop offers an introduction to foundational topics in environmental humanities through an examination of environmental films. The course introduces theories and concepts from history, literature, science, and rhetoric that examine the relationship between humans, more-than-humans, and the natural world.

An Introduction to the Middle East (July 15 – 19)

This workshop explores the nature of the Middle East as an elusive region with characteristics and boundaries upon which few agree. Major topics covered in the class include the physical character of the region, the main political issues confronting individual countries, the population dynamics and differences to be found in the area, and the critical nature of oil and water as regional resources.

Contemporary China (July 29 – August 2)

This workshop, team-taught by the faculty at the University of Utah and Utah State University, offers a broad and in-depth coverage of various aspects of contemporary Chinese society, including art, literature, film, politics, and social structure.

Understanding Utah's Refugee Communities (August 5 – 9)

This course provides an introduction to the refugee populations of Utah from Asia, Africa and the Middle East. The topics covered include overviews of the refugee situation globally and here in Utah; political, cultural and social conditions in the countries of origin of new arriving communities; processes of migration; experiences of communities of refugee background after they arrive in Utah; and integration as a two-way process.


Gateway to Learning Workshops 2012

Sponsored by

Tanner Humanities Center

The Utah State Office of Education

The University of Utah Confucius Center

The University of Utah Asia Center

The Lawrence T. and Janet T. Dee Foundation

The University of Utah College of Humanities Dean’s Office

The University of Utah Enviromental Humanities Program

Aramco Services Company

Fred and Irene Tannenbaum

Jerry Ward, Jr.

 

India through Different Eyes (June 11 – 15)

India is a rising world power, but what is behind this Asian giant? This summer workshop examines India through different eyes: that of an economist, a literature and language scholar, and a historian.

Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (June 11 – 15)

In this course we will deal with a number of themes. These include: Western Civilization and the Jews, AntiSemitism and Racism, Adolf Hitler and the Rise of Nazism, The Nazi Police State, the Biomedical Vision, World War II and Genocide, the West and the Holocaust and Teaching the Holocaust.

The Environment in Film (June 18 – 22)

This workshop offers an introduction to foundational topics in environmental humanities through an examination of environmental films. The course will introduce theories and concepts from philosophy, history, literature, and rhetoric that examine the relationship between humans and the natural world such as the nature/culture divide, environmental ethics, toxicity, and human-animal communication.

Children’s Literature (June 25 – 29)

Studying children’s literature helps us reflect on our notions of children and childhood, enhances and strengthens learning and relationship in the classroom, and how it can help children connect their learning to meaningful parts of their lives.

The Arab Spring: Roots and Repurcussions in the Middle East (July 16 – 20)

This class, taught by three University of Utah Middle East professors, will provide a comprehensive overview of recent critical events in religious, political, social, and economic contexts. 

China Past and Present (July 30 – August 3)

An intensive introduction to the history and culture of China from ancient times to the present, exploring various aspects of Chinese ethics, politics, literature, society, and popular culture.

French and Francophone Studies in Society and Culture (July 30 – August 3)

A course designed to help teachers maintain their French language skills, become better acquainted with important aspects of French and Francophone literature, culture, and history, in addition to many other skills to serve the teachers in their classrooms.

The German Short Story (August 6 – 10)

Participants will read and discuss German, Austrian, and Swiss short stories that can be adapted to the classroom.

A Retrospective Look at the Mexican and Cuban Revoluations (August 6 – 10)

This language immersion workshop will examine the half-century literary and cultural legacies of the Mexican Revolution (1920-1970) and the Cuban Revolution (1959-2009), including their hemispheric impact upon education, civil society, and popular culture.


Gateway to Learning Workshops 2011

Sponsored by

Tanner Humanities Center

The Utah State Office of Education

The University of Utah Confucius Center

The Center for Applied Second Language Studies

 

The Civil War and Reconstruction (Jun 20 – 24)

This workshop will focus on the Civil War and Reconstruction era of American history, beginning roughly with the Mexican War and concluding with the end of Reconstruction in 1877.

Looking Back on the Cold War: Foreign Relations, Domestic Politics and Popular Culture (June 27 – July 1)

This workshop examines the bipolar era of the Cold War, 1945-1991, from the perspective of the unipolar (or nonpolar) “post-9/11” present.

Reconstructing Utah’s History (July 11 – 15)

An introduction to key themes in Utah history, including Native American migrations to the state, Spanish incursions, the arrival of Mormon refugees, the Utah War, and the impact of World War II.

China Past and Present (July 18 – 22)

An intensive introduction to the history and culture of China from ancient times to the present, exploring various aspects of Chinese ethics, politics, literature, society, and popular culture.

French and Francophone Studies in Society and Culture (July 26 – 29)

A course designed to help teachers maintain their French language skills, become better acquainted with important aspects of French and Francophone literature, culture, and history, in addition to many other skills to serve the teachers in their classrooms.

German Culture and Language through Film (August 1 – 5)

This workshop will look at German culture and language through film. Instructors will introduce iconic German films, such as MetropolisTriumph of the Will, and the German "Heimatfilme" of the 50s from the BRD and DDR.

Spanish Language Immersion Workshop (August 1 – 5)

This language immersion workshop, taught by expert professors of Latin American literatures, will explore a variety of cultural expressions from indigenous, Afro-Latino, and mestizo perspectives.


Gateway to Learning Workshops 2010

Sponsored by

Tanner Humanities Center

The Utah State Office of Education

The University of Utah Confucius Center

The Lawrence T. and Janet T. Dee Foundation

 

China Past and Present (June 7 – 11)

An intenstive introduction to the history and culture of China from ancient times to the present, exploring various aspects of Chinese ethics, politics, literature, society, and popular culture.

Reconstructing Utah’s History (June 14 – 17)

An introduction to key themes in Utah history, including Native American migrations to the state, Spanish incursions, the arrival of Mormon refugees, the Utah War, and the impact of World War II.

The Vietnam War (June 21 – 25)

Drawing on new research from the past decade, teachers in this workshop will gain insight into the international context and ramifications of the war, in addition to tools on teaching this subject to their students.

The American Revolution (June 28 – July 2)

A workshop designed to help teachers think about the American Revolution in different ways to help them better understand the historical process, the fundamentals of events that form the foundation of the United States, and how the Revolution experience resonantes with contemporary events and issues.

Children’s Literature (July 12 – 16)

Studying children’s literature helps us reflect on our notions of children and childhood, enhances and strengthens learning and relationship in the classroom, and how it can help children connect their learning to meaningful parts of their lives.

French and Francophone Studies in Society and Culture (July 26 – 30)

A course designed to help teachers maintain their French language skills, become better acquainted with important aspects of French and Francophone literature, culture, and history, in addition to many other skills to serve the teachers in their classrooms.

Empowering students today with lessons from history: Centennial of the Mexican Revolution (July 28 – 20)

A three-day workshop exploring the ways Mexican history can empower studetns of allbackgrounds in Utah classrooms.

Exploring German Literature and Culture: Austria (August 2 – 6)

Participants will learn about Austrian literature, history, contemporary life, politics, and culture.  Participants will develop course materials to use in their classrooms.

Utopias and Dystopias in the Spanish-Speaking World: Twentieth Century through the Present (August 2 – 6)

A language immersion workshop acquainting teachers with the frameworks of utopia and dystopia to study representations of society in Spanish and Latin American literature and culture.

Last Updated: 8/30/16