2012 World Leaders Lecture Forum with Senator George Mitchell
"Turmoil in the Middle East: Its Effect on U.S. Foreign Policy"
April 19, 2012

2012 World Leaders Lecture ForumClick to enlarge

EVENT PHOTOS

PRESS COVERAGE:
George Mitchell at University of Utah forum: 'Israel will have to choose' | Salt Lake Tribune
Senator George Mitchell interview | KCPW

 

George MitchellIn the 21st century, the Middle East has played a key role in world politics and the global economy. At the same time, the region has experienced sweeping changes: ongoing conflicts, the emergence of radical groups with world-wide reach, and the rise of democratic movements seeking to overthrow authoritarian regimes.  These events create new opportunities and challenges for international stability and cooperation. In his lecture, Senator Mitchell will discuss the turbulent events in the Middle East, including Iran’s nuclear aspirations, civil violence in Syria, the "Arab Spring," and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He will also consider how these events affect American policies, interests, and security.

George J. Mitchell served the Obama Administration as Special Envoy for Middle East Peace from 2009-2011. This role was informed by his previous work in the region, specifically as the creator of the Mitchell Report on Arab-Israeli matters in 2001. Mitchell also chaired peace negotiations in Northern Ireland, culminating in the Good Friday Agreement for which he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Mitchell was appointed to the United States Senate in 1980 to complete the unexpired term of Sen. Edmund Muskie of Maine. After an illustrious career, he left the Senate in 1995 as the Senate majority leader, a position he had held since January 1989.

Respected for his commitment to fairness, the former senator chaired commissions on questions facing the Olympic bidding processes and the doping scandal surrounding Major League Baseball. In the private sector, Mitchell has served on the boards of Federal Express, Staples, Xerox, Unilever and was tapped to replace Michael Eisner as Disney's chairman.