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STERLING M. McMURRIN LECTURE
ON RELIGION & CULTURE

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WORLD LEADERS LECTURE FORUM

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MORMON STUDIES INITIATIVE

In 2010, the Tanner Humanities Center launched an initiative to support the study of Mormonism on campus and in the wider community. This initiative encourages vibrant, intellectual exploration of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, its people, values, history, culture, and institutions. To learn more, click here.

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"It is the work of many minds, hearts, and hands. It is work that raises us all."
- Bob Goldberg, Professor of History
Director, Tanner Humanities Center


MORMON STUDIES INITIATIVE
NAMES BRIAN BIRCH FIRST MARLIN K. JENSEN SCHOLAR IN RESIDENCE

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MORMON STUDIES NEWSLETTER
 
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Philosophy Colloquium Series presents Neil Sinhababu from the National University of Singapore

Thursday, September 1, 2016, 2:30 - 4:30pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

More information will be coming soon.


“Leonard Arrington and the Writing of Mormon History” - Gregory A. Prince, Friends of the Library Lecture

Sunday, September 11, 2016, 3 - 4pm
Marriott Library - J. Willard (M LIB)

Leonard Arrington is considered by many the foremost twentieth-century historian of Mormonism. He played a key role in establishing the Western History Association and the Mormon History Association, and more than a half-century after its publication, his revised doctoral dissertation, Great Basin Kingdom: An Economic History of the Latter-day Saints 1830-1900, remains a standard. But Arrington’s career was not without controversy. Gregory Prince takes an in-depth look at this respected historian and, in telling Arrington’s story, gives readers insight into the workings of the LDS Church in the late 20th century.


Symposium on Teaching and Learning: Faculty as Designers of Student Success

Thursday, September 29 - Friday, September 30, 2016
Marriott Library - J. Willard (M LIB)

Registration Deadline: September 26th September 29: 11:30 A.M. – 4:45 P.M. September 30: 8:00 A.M. – 2:00 P.M. Come be a part of the transformation in teaching and learning here at the U! This symposium will bring together our most innovative and dedicated teaching faculty to explore new possibilities and take undergraduate education and the role of faculty to the next level.  Four speakers from around the country will join us in the conversation as we define new directions to guide our local practices within the areas of inclusivity, technology, and goals for our students.  This is your opportunity to reinvigorate learning within your own classroom as well as broaden our impact on student success. Are you ready to ask a new set of questions of our teaching mission? Let’s not rehabilitate. Let us elevate!


"Downwinders" Film Screening

Monday, October 3, 2016, 6 - 8:30pm
Marriott Library - J. Willard (M LIB)

"The questionable things our government will do in the name of "national security" is not something new. It started a long time ago." Come see the free screening of director Tim Skousen's "Downwinders" at the Gould Auditorium! A panel will follow the film with panelists: Jim Matheson, former Congressman Mary Dickson, advocate, playwrite (Exposed) Tim Skousen, director with moderator Fred Esplin, Vice President of University Relations.


"Why Liberals Win the Culture Wars (Even When They Lose Elections) - Sterling McMurrin Lecture with Stephen Prothero

Thursday, October 6, 2016, 7 - 9pm

Boston University Professor Stephen Prothero places today’s heated culture wars within the context of a centuries-long struggle of right versus left and religious versus secular to reveal how, ultimately, liberals always win. Prothero takes us on a lively tour through time, bringing into focus the election of 1800, which pitted Calvinists and Federalists against Jeffersonians and “infidels;” the Protestants’ campaign against Catholics in the mid-nineteenth century; the anti-Mormon crusade of the Victorian era; the fundamentalist-modernist debates of the 1920s; the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s; and the current crusade against Islam. As Prothero makes clear, our culture wars have always been religious wars, progressing through the same stages of conservative reaction to liberal victory that eventually benefit all Americans. Drawing on his impressive depth of knowledge and detailed research, he explains how competing religious beliefs have continually molded our political, economic, and sociological discourse and reveals how the conflicts which separate us today, like those that came before, are actually the byproduct of our struggle to come to terms with inclusiveness and ideals of “Americanness.” To explore these battles, he reminds us, is to look into the soul of America—and perhaps find essential answers to the questions that beset us.


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Last Updated: 8/10/16